The Washington Post: For first time since 2010, America’s progress on health insurance stalls

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The Washington Post: For first time since 2010, America’s progress on health insurance stalls

It’s easy to talk about healthcare in terms of percentages and statistics. But those numbers represent real-life consequences for people across the country, including those with pre-existing conditions, those fighting cancer, and those with chronically ill family members.

Having reliable healthcare can make a huge difference in people’s lives—which is why it’s such a shame that this administration continues to do whatever it can to roll back the progress we’ve made in helping more Americans get covered.

If you stand with Sherrod, who fights every day for expanding access to healthcare—not taking it away from those who need it most—show your support now.

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The Washington Post: For first time since 2010, America’s progress on health insurance stalls

Jeff Stein – September 12, 2018

Key points:

  • America’s uninsured rate held essentially steady from 2016 to 2017, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures published on Wednesday.

  • That makes this the first year this decade that the nation did not make progress in reducing the ranks of those without health insurance.

  • In 2016, 8.8% of the American population — or 28.1 million people — did not have health insurance. In 2017, the number of those without health care rose by about 400,000 people to 28.5 million while the rate of the uninsured did not change, according to Census Bureau figures.

  • The reversal comes after nearly a decade of progress in bolstering the number of Americans with health care.

  • From 2010 to 2016, the uninsured rate fell dramatically — nearly in half — as tens of millions of more people were signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act signed by President Obama in 2010.

  • Fourteen states saw increases in their uninsured populations in 2017, compared to just three states — New York, California, and Louisiana, which recently expanded Medicaid — that saw the number of uninsured fall.

  • Some health care experts blamed the Trump administration for eliminating the Affordable Care Act’s outreach budget.

Read more here.