Washington Post: HUD Secretary Ben Carson to propose raising rent for low-income Americans receiving federal housing subsidies

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Washington Post: HUD Secretary Ben Carson to propose raising rent for low-income Americans receiving federal housing subsidies

Earlier this week, HUD Secretary Ben Carson proposed raising rent costs for Americans who are already struggling to put food on the table.

The move is completely unnecessary, and it comes at a time when—as Sherrod has pointed out repeatedly—the wealthiest 1%, Wall Street, and corporations are raking in profits from the GOP’s tax scam. Carson’s proposal is just the latest example of this administration making life more difficult for too many hardworking Americans, while the wealthiest among us receive millions. How is that fair?

Washington Post: HUD Secretary Ben Carson to propose raising rent for low-income Americans receiving federal housing subsidies

Tracy Jan, Caitlin Dewey and Jeff Stein – April 25, 2018

Key points:

  • Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson proposed far-reaching changes to federal housing subsidies Wednesday. If these changes become a reality, they would triple rent for the poorest households, and make it easier for housing authorities to impose work requirements.
  • Carson’s proposals, and other initiatives aimed at low-income Americans receiving federal assistance, are part of Congressional Republicans’ and the Trump administration’s efforts to restrict access to the safety net and reduce the levels of assistance for those who do qualify.
  • Carson’s proposal also comes just after Trump signed an executive order directing federal agencies to expand work requirements for low-income Americans receiving Medicaid, food stamps, public housing benefits and welfare.
  • Under the provisions, the cap on rent for the poorest families would rise to about $150 a month—three times higher than the existing $50 ceiling. About 712,000 households would see their monthly rents rise to $150, officials said.
  • Carson’s proposals—affecting housing, food stamps and Medicaid—would require congressional approval.

Read more here.