Extend the freedom to marry to all Americans

News

Extend the freedom to marry to all Americans

Because Ohio’s constitution does not allow same sex couples to marry, Jim Obergefell and his husband, John Arthur, had to travel out of state to tie the knot. But after John passed away, the state of Ohio refused to honor their marriage.

Jim fought back, and on April 28th his case will be heard in the Supreme Court.

Earlier this month, I had the privilege to meet with Jim. And he told me what he tells everyone who will listen — he wants his marriage to be recognized and for the simple human right to marry the person he loves.
For Jim, this case is personal. But for the country, his case could represent the opportunity to legalize full marriage equality in all 50 states.

Our country is moving in the right direction. 37 states, including the District of Columbia, same-sex couples have the freedom to marry.

In 2011, the President ended the military’s discriminatory “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. And in 2013 the Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) that denied federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples.

Now, it’s time for the Supreme Court to get in-step with what the rest of the country already knows: Every American, no matter who they are or where they live, should be allowed to marry the person they love.