Columbus Dispatch: Report – Top Ohio jobs don’t pay enough to cover rent

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Columbus Dispatch: Report – Top Ohio jobs don’t pay enough to cover rent

Yesterday, multiple news outlets released devastating numbers for those working jobs with hourly wages in Ohio. A study out yesterday morning demonstrates that inflation-adjusted hourly wages haven’t changed in the past year. And a report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition and the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio shows that of the 10 most common jobs in the state, just two pay enough for a worker to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment.

Meanwhile, Republican leaders and the White House continue to claim that the tax scam they rushed through earlier this year would help working families. Numbers like these show that’s clearly not the case.

Sherrod fought that tax bill, and against policies that help the wealthiest 1% at the expense of everyone else—and he fights for Ohio families every day. If you’re with him, show your support now:

Columbus Dispatch: Report – Top Ohio jobs don’t pay enough to cover rent

Rita Price – June 13, 2018

Key points:

  • Of the 10 most common jobs in Ohio, just two pay enough for a worker to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment.

  • The news comes from a report released Wednesday by the National Low Income Housing Coalition and the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio. It said the state’s “housing wage”—the hourly wage a renter needs to earn to pay for a basic, two-bedroom unit—increased again this year to $15.25.

  • Median hourly wages for registered nurses ($30.59) and customer-service representatives ($15.34) were higher than the amount needed, but the other eight occupations with the most employees fell below.

  • Other top Ohio jobs and their median hourly wages include food preparation ($9.40), retail salesperson ($10.41), cashiers ($9.33), laborers and freight movers ($12.66), waiters ($9.45), office clerks ($14.42), janitors ($11.59) and stock clerks ($11.65).

  • The report is out at the same time that Housing Secretary Ben Carson has floated a much-derided proposal that could raise rents for millions of poor Americans receiving federal housing assistance through the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Read more here.