Voting rights are on the ballot

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Voting rights are on the ballot

This week, a conservative majority on the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in the Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute case that Ohio’s Secretary of State can continue purging millions of eligible registered voters from Ohio’s roll. They ruled this way even though, as Justice Sotomayor stated in dissent, Ohio’s policy on purging eligible voters “has disproportionately affected minority, low-income, disabled, and veteran voters.”

When Sherrod was Ohio Secretary of State, things looked a little different. In that role, he put a lot of effort into making sure more people—not fewer—could vote. Sherrod set up voter registration sites in high schools, food banks, in the Bureau of Motor vehicles. He got McDonald’s to print voter registration forms on their tray liners. You read that correctly: You could order a Big Mac and fill out a voter registration form.

Here’s Sherrod talking about his work to expand the right to vote:

 

 

Sherrod understands that no matter your situation in life, you’re entitled to the right to vote. That’s what our country is about.

And this week’s decision is a reminder we need to support leaders like Sherrod. Voting rights are on the ballot this year, and our democracy is strongest when everyone can participate.